About Us

Juried Artist/Studio:

Joe Kopp

Business Name:

Joe Kopp Art

Short Description:

"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have the opportunity to extend your vision?" said Edward Weston. My goal as a photographer is to extend my vision. This process happens in three stages of my photography. First, the time and place that I choose to shoot an image. Secondly, the use of various settings, lenses and filters on my camera, and lastly, the capacity of programs such as Lightroom or Photoshop. I travel throughout North America capturing images of beauty and awe. Each photo is a moment frozen in time that will forever tell the story of a place, emotion or circumstance. Few things bring me greater joy than when others are swept away in memories or wonder contemplating my art.

Email Address:
Awards and Honors

Best of Missouri Hands – Juried Member

Greater St. Louis Artists Association – Juried Member

Resident Artist at Stone Soup Galleries in Chesterfield Mall July 2018 to present.

Anonymous Donor Award winner, “Illuminating the Night” St. Louis Artist Guild –  August 2016

I’ve been in many shows in the St. Louis area and beyond.

Historic Shaw Art Fair, St. Louis, Missouri

Art Fair at Queeny, Ballwin, Missouri

Mosaics Fine Art Show, St. Charles, Missouri

Fine Art and Winefest, Washington, Missouri

Cedarhurst, Mt. Vernon, Illinois

Celebrate Wildwood, Wildwood, Missouri

Salute to the Arts, Fairview Heights, Illinois

Art in the Park, Francis Park, St. Louis, Missouri

Unique Boutique, JBS, St. Louis, Missouri

Artists Boutique, Kirkwood, Missouri

Lincoln Arts Festival, Lincoln, Nebraska

 

 

Coming Soon

About Our Art

“In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks.” ~ John Muir

I travel throughout North America capturing images of beauty and awe.  Each photo is a moment frozen in time that will forever tell the story of a place, emotion or circumstance.  Few things bring me greater joy than when others are swept away in memories or wonder contemplating my art.

 

Images are taken with a DSLR on location using a Canon 6d, various settings, lenses, filters, and other equipment.  Images are post-processed in Lightroom and Photoshop.

What did it take to get that photograph?  In the past, I would attend art shows and festivals and look down at the photographer as one who could just click the button one time and sell the photograph forever.  While there is still a truth in that thought, what exactly is involved in that click?

One of my favorite photographs is from a workshop that was held in Utah primarily around Arches National Park.  Preplanning for this image involved knowing when the milky way would be visible through the North Window Arch. This is usually easiest during the new moon of the lunar phase.  I use a program called, “Photopils” to do this. A good milky way shot requires a sturdy tripod, beneficial things to have would include a camera that can do an extended exposure of with a high f/stop, and an ISO of 800 to 3200 and an intervalometer or remote.  Also, a wide angle lens is helpful, but not an absolute necessity.

This image required the coordination of three people One person was light painting.  This is using artificial light to illuminate an object (the image was done before the current law which has made light painting illegal in many National Parks).

In this case, Jerry was light painting the arch.  The second person was our model, Sapna, who would stand with her arms outstretched for 30 seconds at a time for each attempted exposure.  Lastly, I was taking the photo.  The milky way was going to be best early in the morning so we headed out at around 2:00 am and began shooting around 3 am.  After many variations with and without models, I got the final image at 3:58 am on March 21.

After returning to the hotel, images are downloaded into my computer.  Then again into an Adobe program called, “Lightroom” for post-processing.  Lightroom allows the photographer the ability to adjust exposure, contrast, highlights, shadows, clarity, and vibrancy to name a small percentage of processes.  After processing in Lightroom, many images will be further processed in Photoshop.  Once an image has been processed to my satisfaction, I will export the image back to the computer and send it to the printer.  Photography printing can be done on a multitude of surfaces.  My favorite surface is metal prints using a process called, “dye sublimation.”